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Author Topic: Breast Cancer  (Read 2550 times)

Reading abut the problems of screening:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/women_shealth/9032733/Breast-cancer-screening-can-no-longer-be-justified.html
led me to wonder: How do the ladies on here feel about it? Been screened?

Are working ladies susceptible to cancer at all?
Have any of you ever punted a lady who has had a mastectomy? I once tried to book such a lady and she did not reply. I would be happy to do it at least once.

ny experiences or views to share?

PS
I am not a Telegraph reader, a friend whose wife has C sent me the link. I read the Guardian.

Offline AnthG

I once tried to book such a lady and she did not reply. I would be happy to do it at least once.

ny experiences or views to share?
The thing is I believe you are in the serious minority with the girls you go after HP.

I think the vast majority of guys just book and just want to book those in their early to mid 20s so they would never be put into that situation to make such a decision.

Offline Dani

  • Service Provider
  • Posts: 2,593

I think the vast majority of guys just book and just want to book those in their early to mid 20s so they would never be put into that situation to make such a decision.

Why not? You do know that breast cancer can affect anyone of any age dont you?  Yes, it is more associated with older women but children can also get it as can teenagers and men

Offline lovingfacials

Cassie makes a very valid point - men also can get breast cancer and ususally the situaltion if far worse as men are not screened for it and so its found late and usually mutated to other areas

Men should cheek their balls and breasts

Offline EnglishRebecca121

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  • Posts: 2,226
my sister had it at 24

people are getting cancer younger and younger i believe manily due to our lifestyles


This is a subject very close to my heart. My wife, Mags, was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time two weeks after we met. Long story short, we decided to live life to the full. We travelled, partied, loved, lived, cried, went to chemo sessions, made lifelong friends, travelled the world for a cure (she was a bit alternative!), comforted and eventually let go. I spent a week at her bedside. She died in September 2002. She was 49 years old and I spent the best five years of my life with her and she taught me so much about living life. So now, in memory of my Maggie, I volunteer as a partner councillor for Breast Cancer Care, talking to people - mostly men but some women - whose partners are dealing with breast cancer. There are easier ways of spending your evenings & weekends but nothing as satisfying.

Offline lovingfacials

Maiden

Fair play to you for sharing and honouring her memory with thiose actions - hats off to you

Offline rpg

This is a subject very close to my heart. My wife, Mags, was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time two weeks after we met. Long story short, we decided to live life to the full. We travelled, partied, loved, lived, cried, went to chemo sessions, made lifelong friends, travelled the world for a cure (she was a bit alternative!), comforted and eventually let go. I spent a week at her bedside. She died in September 2002. She was 49 years old and I spent the best five years of my life with her and she taught me so much about living life. So now, in memory of my Maggie, I volunteer as a partner councillor for Breast Cancer Care, talking to people - mostly men but some women - whose partners are dealing with breast cancer. There are easier ways of spending your evenings & weekends but nothing as satisfying.

Difficult for a lot of us who haven't experienced this to understand the trauma. Thanks for sharing and much respect.

Maiden

Fair play to you for sharing and honouring her memory with thiose actions - hats off to you
+1


Offline jasmine

This is a subject very close to my heart. My wife, Mags, was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time two weeks after we met. Long story short, we decided to live life to the full. We travelled, partied, loved, lived, cried, went to chemo sessions, made lifelong friends, travelled the world for a cure (she was a bit alternative!), comforted and eventually let go. I spent a week at her bedside. She died in September 2002. She was 49 years old and I spent the best five years of my life with her and she taught me so much about living life. So now, in memory of my Maggie, I volunteer as a partner councillor for Breast Cancer Care, talking to people - mostly men but some women - whose partners are dealing with breast cancer. There are easier ways of spending your evenings & weekends but nothing as satisfying.

It sounds like you were both very fortunate to have found each other, and she is no doubt looking down proud on you for your volunteer work  :)

I have one of the brca genes, so I've been going for yearly mammograms since I turned 20 and then am considering preventative surgery when I'm in my thirties.

It sounds like you were both very fortunate to have found each other, and she is no doubt looking down proud on you for your volunteer work  :)

I have one of the brca genes, so I've been going for yearly mammograms since I turned 20 and then am considering preventative surgery when I'm in my thirties.
Jasmine, I am and will remain a very lucky fella to have shared those years with Mags.
I am no expert on the condition but as you carry one of the brca's you are doing absolutely the right thing to have regular checks. I guess you are regularly self checking - or getting someone else to do it for you - in between. Try not to be a slave to it, just love your breasts!

Offline thickerdicker

 :)  At least with a Democratic government now in the US they can get on with the research that was delayed by 8 years thanks to dumb shit G.Bush ,as he had to keep his Religious right wing fanatics happy as they backed his Presidential bid with $$$$$$$$$$$$ !

8 years on the back burner i read in research terms with human embryo's research!  The religious lot that back his campaign had him by the bollocks on that one as deemed  as not righteous or humane!

The fact is they were still doing it on the side  in other parts of the world and are making great strides with Cancer overall! I read in National Geographic i believe or maybe it was on TV , that a Vegetable that in the middle ages that used to get mistaken as a baby as its shaped like one has magical properties!  They found out if i recall that enzymes from the root plant holds back cell growth and also fights off the bad cancerous ones! It was on BBC world news at xmas time if recall! The medic researcher that discovered this was testing all sorts of vegetables and stumbled across this remarkable find in her experimental research? i am sure it was for all cancer's?

I am not in a scientific job or field but the rain forests are being cut down at a phenominal rate, where maybe future cures can be found! Afterall they found paracetamol there and that's great for headaches!

Offline Cat Lady

The fact is they were still doing it on the side  in other parts of the world and are making great strides with Cancer overall! I read in National Geographic i believe or maybe it was on TV , that a Vegetable that in the middle ages that used to get mistaken as a baby as its shaped like one has magical properties!  They found out if i recall that enzymes from the root plant holds back cell growth and also fights off the bad cancerous ones! It was on BBC world news at xmas time if recall! The medic researcher that discovered this was testing all sorts of vegetables and stumbled across this remarkable find in her experimental research? i am sure it was for all cancer's?

Mandrake (mandragora officinarum)?

Offline smiths

Reading abut the problems of screening:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/women_shealth/9032733/Breast-cancer-screening-can-no-longer-be-justified.html
led me to wonder: How do the ladies on here feel about it? Been screened?

Are working ladies susceptible to cancer at all?
Have any of you ever punted a lady who has had a mastectomy? I once tried to book such a lady and she did not reply. I would be happy to do it at least once.

ny experiences or views to share?

PS
I am not a Telegraph reader, a friend whose wife has C sent me the link. I read the Guardian.

Are WGs susceptible to cancer, what a very odd thing to post, as they are women the answer is obviously yes.

I punt for fun so talking about Cancer at a punt would be a total turn-off. A friend has had Breast Cancer diagnosed early and she has made a complete recovery, obviously i hope there isnt a recurrance.

Offline smiths

This is a subject very close to my heart. My wife, Mags, was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time two weeks after we met. Long story short, we decided to live life to the full. We travelled, partied, loved, lived, cried, went to chemo sessions, made lifelong friends, travelled the world for a cure (she was a bit alternative!), comforted and eventually let go. I spent a week at her bedside. She died in September 2002. She was 49 years old and I spent the best five years of my life with her and she taught me so much about living life. So now, in memory of my Maggie, I volunteer as a partner councillor for Breast Cancer Care, talking to people - mostly men but some women - whose partners are dealing with breast cancer. There are easier ways of spending your evenings & weekends but nothing as satisfying.

Thanks for sharing. ;)I lost my mother while still a child to Cancer and one of my Nans.

Offline skittish

This is a subject very close to my heart. My wife, Mags, was diagnosed with breast cancer for the second time two weeks after we met. Long story short, we decided to live life to the full. We travelled, partied, loved, lived, cried, went to chemo sessions, made lifelong friends, travelled the world for a cure (she was a bit alternative!), comforted and eventually let go. I spent a week at her bedside. She died in September 2002. She was 49 years old and I spent the best five years of my life with her and she taught me so much about living life. So now, in memory of my Maggie, I volunteer as a partner councillor for Breast Cancer Care, talking to people - mostly men but some women - whose partners are dealing with breast cancer. There are easier ways of spending your evenings & weekends but nothing as satisfying.

I've resisted reading this thread until now, I lost my wife to Lymphoma 5 years ago aged 37.
My closest friend recently diagnosed also with Lymphoma is currently receiving radiotherapy.
We received unmeasurable support from Macmillan and I'm not sure how I would have coped otherwise.

I salute you sir for your selfless dedication.  :hi: 

Thanks Smiths & Skittish. It's a sad old business. Quite rightly, the people suffering the dis-ease (Maggie's terminology for her condition) are the main focus of attention. A lot of the time the partner, who is generally the primary carer, is living the nightmare completely alone with no emotional help at all. And when the end eventually comes is normally left high & dry to get on with it. All I try to do is be at the end of a phone to offer some support when it's needed.

Good for you, miw56.  As a former Samaritan volunteer, I know where you're coming from.




Diolch i ti hefyd.

I'll leave it to you, miw56, to explain wtf our exchange has been about! ;)



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