Author Topic: What happens in a Sauna  (Read 3446 times)

What happens in a Sauna
« on: February 08, 2014, 04:36:57 pm »
Hi pals,
I am new to this whole punting thing. I had only 4 punts so far. Right now I am interested in Sauna. I want to try it but dont really know what to do when I get in the door. Can someone tell me a step by step. And would it be more expensive than AW? or the same? Cheers in advance! :hi:

Offline Gordo987

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2014, 04:49:07 pm »
Basically, you get to the door and ring the bell. Somebody will buzz you in, or you might get a voice on an intercom asking you if you want a sauna, and then they buzz you in. Of course it's the massage that cums after the sauna that we are all interested in.  :cool:

Offline Jerboa

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2014, 07:09:29 pm »
You take all your clothes off, have a shower, then with towel walk into sauna and start sweating.

Offline DaveMugabe

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2014, 11:12:30 pm »
Take some water into the sauna with you, and take plenty of sips.

In a steam sauna you should pour ladles of water onto the hot rocks on occassion (they will be there in the room)

In a dry sauna, DO NOT pour water anywhere.

If you feel too hot or faint, get out an cool off for a bit. :drinks:

Offline berksboy

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2014, 12:21:55 am »
    Just take great care as to what sort of sauna you go to !  :rolleyes:

Offline Gordo987

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2014, 06:20:44 pm »
Hi pals,
I am new to this whole punting thing. I had only 4 punts so far. Right now I am interested in Sauna. I want to try it but dont really know what to do when I get in the door. Can someone tell me a step by step. And would it be more expensive than AW? or the same? Cheers in advance! :hi:

Just to be clear, is the OP looking for a 'proper' sauna, or a knocking shop advertising itself as a sauna? :unknown:

Offline Jerboa

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2014, 11:35:16 pm »
Just to be clear, is the OP looking for a 'proper' sauna, or a knocking shop advertising itself as a sauna? :unknown:

We'll I was under the impression he wasn't sure on what you do in a Finnish sauna. :)

Offline overhead

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2014, 05:00:17 am »
We'll I was under the impression he wasn't sure on what you do in a Finnish sauna. :)

I don't think anyone on here does anyway.

A Sauna is a room with wooden walls and ceiling which absorbs moisture from the air. There is a heater that has rocks on it and the temperature in the room is anywhere between 80 and 120 celsius. You put water on the rocks to increase the humidity and that makes you sweat profusely because the sweat on your skin can't evaporate as quickly as it does in dry air. The idea being that sweating like that removes dirt and dead skin. It's a method of washing, and in the north they often jump in a nearby lake to rinse off. Also it gets rid of things like excess salt from your blood. It's very healthy and a good excuse for a few beers afterwards to re-hydrate!

All the stuff that goes on with girls falls outside the basic principle. I don't think I'd use a sauna in the UK - a) expensive,  b) they don't know how to use them here anyway.

Offline Gordo987

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2014, 10:50:58 am »
I don't think anyone on here does anyway.

A Sauna is a room with wooden walls and ceiling which absorbs moisture from the air. There is a heater that has rocks on it and the temperature in the room is anywhere between 80 and 120 celsius. You put water on the rocks to increase the humidity and that makes you sweat profusely because the sweat on your skin can't evaporate as quickly as it does in dry air. The idea being that sweating like that removes dirt and dead skin. It's a method of washing, and in the north they often jump in a nearby lake to rinse off. Also it gets rid of things like excess salt from your blood. It's very healthy and a good excuse for a few beers afterwards to re-hydrate!

All the stuff that goes on with girls falls outside the basic principle. I don't think I'd use a sauna in the UK - a) expensive,  b) they don't know how to use them here anyway.

Wow, I think I'm going to stick to Swedish saunas in future!



 :scare:

Offline Jay-Jay

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2014, 10:57:12 am »
Back in the day "a sauna" was the reserve of males into arse-banditry ! :P

Jay

Offline Gordo987

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2014, 12:35:21 pm »
Back in the day "a sauna" was the reserve of males into arse-banditry ! :P

Jay

Back in the 80s I used to go to a couple of mixed saunas, and the only arses I wanted to 'bandit' were the ones sported by some very fuckable females. :cool:

I think you may be confusing saunas with the old Turkish baths (remember The Day of the Jackal?).  :blush:

Offline overhead

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2014, 01:24:44 pm »
Wow, I think I'm going to stick to Swedish saunas in future!

Saunas are from Finland, not Sweden. And those temperatures are not high. The whole idea is to sweat, and that cools you down.

Offline Jerboa

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2014, 04:51:17 pm »
Many of these so called Saunas in the UK the sauna is switched off, have used them in German saunaclubs, sometimes the ladies come in to use the sauna too.

Offline DaveMugabe

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2014, 07:43:43 pm »
Saunas are from Finland, not Sweden. And those temperatures are not high. The whole idea is to sweat, and that cools you down.
Sorry you would definitely die in about 30seconds (maybe a bit longer, but your lungs would probably be frazzled in two breaths) if you were in a room with a temperature of 80 degrees Celsius.  You cannot get 120 celsius and still have water unless high pressure is involved, temperaure would stay at 100 untill all the water turns to steam.  The steam would melt your skin and flesh at 120 degrees celcius, the steam would be known as superheated steam (used in cracking crude oil).  Pasteurisation occurs at around 60 degrees celsius.

You mean farenheit possibly


Tried fucking in a normal sauna once - not too comfortable
« Last Edit: February 11, 2014, 07:46:01 pm by davew987654321 »

Offline overhead

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2014, 11:04:36 pm »
Sorry you would definitely die in about 30seconds (maybe a bit longer, but your lungs would probably be frazzled in two breaths) if you were in a room with a temperature of 80 degrees Celsius.  You cannot get 120 celsius and still have water unless high pressure is involved, temperaure would stay at 100 untill all the water turns to steam.  The steam would melt your skin and flesh at 120 degrees celcius, the steam would be known as superheated steam (used in cracking crude oil).  Pasteurisation occurs at around 60 degrees celsius.

You mean farenheit possibly


Tried fucking in a normal sauna once - not too comfortable

Oh well, that just shows how little you know. I suggest you check your facts before spouting off like that.

I've been in a proper sauna many times, and as a matter of fact I think 80 celcius is about the minimum the temperature needs to be in order to be effective. 120 is a bit strong, and 115 is the highest I have personally experienced, but I've heard stories of guys in the Finnish army staging competitions to see how high a temperature they can endure, and temperatures around 150 have been mentioned. It's surprisingly comfortable until you pour water on the stones. As the steam circulates it has an enormous effect. You have to experience it before you comment, otherwise you look like a complete idiot to those who know better.

Further reading for you.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauna

And the more extreme stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Sauna_Championships


Offline DaveMugabe

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2014, 12:49:27 am »
"On 7 August 2010, Russian finalist and former third-place finisher Vladimir Ladyzhensky and Finnish five-time champion Timo Kaukonen passed out after six minutes in the sauna, both suffering from terrible burns and trauma. According to a spectator who asked not to be identified, Kaukonen was able to leave the sauna with assistance, but Ladyzhensky had to be dragged out, and almost immediately went into cramps and convulsions.[5] Ladyzhensky died despite resuscitation and Kaukonen was rushed to the hospital.[6] He was reported to suffer from extreme burn injuries, and his condition was described as critical, but stable."


When you add water onto dry stones at 110 degrees celsius, the water turns to steam, absorbing some of the heat.  This heat abosorbed is known as Latent Heat of Vaporisation / Evaporation.  The temperature therefore drops.  So temperature drops every thirty seconds by the method described in your link.  The steam thus created is not under pressure, thererfore the temperature of the steam will be at 100.

At 1 bar pressure water cannot be heated to over 100 degrees celsius.  Steam at 120 will melt your skin and flesh.  I did my A level Chemistry project on Latent Heat (there one for the freezing point also)

What you are talking about is the temperature of the rock.  Yes the rocks could be far hotter than 120 but that does not mean the steam is.  Steam below 100 will condense back into water.  So if you are going to split hairs, the temperature in all saunas will be 100 degrees.  However when you breathe it in, temperature drops due to the physiological defenses you have.

Problem is your defences can only work for so long as essentially the mechanism for reducing the temperature of steam reaching your lungs is also Latent Heat of water. So once that defence is depleted, then you have a problem.  That 30 second limit I mentioned in my last post is most likely wrong -it might be more like a few minutes, reading the articles you have linked.

Offline Gordo987

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2014, 01:01:16 am »
Oh well, that just shows how little you know. I suggest you check your facts before spouting off like that.

I've been in a proper sauna many times, and as a matter of fact I think 80 celcius is about the minimum the temperature needs to be in order to be effective. 120 is a bit strong, and 115 is the highest I have personally experienced, but I've heard stories of guys in the Finnish army staging competitions to see how high a temperature they can endure, and temperatures around 150 have been mentioned. It's surprisingly comfortable until you pour water on the stones. As the steam circulates it has an enormous effect. You have to experience it before you comment, otherwise you look like a complete idiot to those who know better.

Further reading for you.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauna

And the more extreme stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Sauna_Championships

Shit! somebody is actually quoting Wikipedia!  :crazy: Probably one should rest one's case, but let's just imagine sitting in a room in which the temperature is above boiling point. Anything above 40 degrees C is likely to be lethal after not too long. FMWAC  :dash:


Offline Gordo987

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2014, 01:05:21 am »
Saunas are from Finland, not Sweden. And those temperatures are not high. The whole idea is to sweat, and that cools you down.

Gee professor Pedantic - ity! You are sooooo brainy!!  :wacko:

Offline DaveMugabe

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2014, 01:06:01 am »
The other point to remember is that air is a bad conductor of heat.  so when the walls, rocks etc are at 110 degrees, doesnt mean the temperature reaching you is at that point too.

Steam however does carry heat better than dry air, so the temperature reaching you will be 100 for esch molcule of steam reaching you.  The more steam there is, more heat will therefore reach you.  Which is why its uncomfortable if there is more steam.

I should have been more specific in my first post - reading it back, I can see that it gives a wrong impression. I was lazy and trying to describe a complex chemical phenomenon is quite a blase way.  Apologies.

The natural defences we have, allows things like people walking over hot coals which may be at 400 degrees, But the temperature reaching thier nerves might only be around 50-60.  Decribing it involves going into detail about physiological reaction in our bodies, and I only have a basic knowledge about that (my project did not focus on the mechanism, just the effect), also its very late.  But there must be good explanation on t'net as to why people can walk over hot coals but not get burnt.  Its the same principle.

Offline overhead

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2014, 01:07:18 am »
"On 7 August 2010, Russian finalist and former third-place finisher Vladimir Ladyzhensky and Finnish five-time champion Timo Kaukonen passed out after six minutes in the sauna, both suffering from terrible burns and trauma. According to a spectator who asked not to be identified, Kaukonen was able to leave the sauna with assistance, but Ladyzhensky had to be dragged out, and almost immediately went into cramps and convulsions.[5] Ladyzhensky died despite resuscitation and Kaukonen was rushed to the hospital.[6] He was reported to suffer from extreme burn injuries, and his condition was described as critical, but stable."


When you add water onto dry stones at 110 degrees celsius, the water turns to steam, absorbing some of the heat.  This heat abosorbed is known as Latent Heat of Vaporisation / Evaporation.  The temperature therefore drops.  So temperature drops every thirty seconds by the method described in your link.  The steam thus created is not under pressure, thererfore the temperature of the steam will be at 100.

At 1 bar pressure water cannot be heated to over 100 degrees celsius.  Steam at 120 will melt your skin and flesh.  I did my A level Chemistry project on Latent Heat (there one for the freezing point also)

What you are talking about is the temperature of the rock.  Yes the rocks could be far hotter than 120 but that does not mean the steam is.  Steam below 100 will condense back into water.  So if you are going to split hairs, the temperature in all saunas will be 100 degrees.  However when you breathe it in, temperature drops due to the physiological defenses you have.

Problem is your defences can only work for so long as essentially the mechanism for reducing the temperature of steam reaching your lungs is also Latent Heat of water. So once that defence is depleted, then you have a problem.  That 30 second limit I mentioned in my last post is most likely wrong -it might be more like a few minutes, reading the articles you have linked.

When you have experienced it you can talk about it. Not before.

Offline overhead

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2014, 01:09:04 am »
Gee professor Pedantic - ity! You are sooooo brainy!!

And you seem to be not so.

Offline DaveMugabe

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2014, 01:10:39 am »
When you have experienced it you can talk about it. Not before.
You think I  havent been in a sauna?? :crazy: :wacko:


It is true though that I havent died yet

Offline overhead

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2014, 01:16:22 am »
You think I  havent been in a sauna??

It is true though that I havent died yet

I can only believe that if you have been, then the heater was off at the time.

Offline vorian

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2014, 02:05:46 am »
Maybe it is just me but I assumed the OP is a semi newbie punter looking for some advice and help in relation to SEXUAL activities one could expect in a sauna environment how one goes about paying for the sex, asking about the sex, how to get the sex. That sort of thing, a punter asking a other punters about punting.

Not and maybe the OP can correct me if I'm wrong the very detailed breakdown of how saunas technically work, the history and origins of saunas and the way saunas effect the body was not perhaps what he was looking to learn from UKP. This information seems more suited to "Saunas Monthly". Then it becomes an argument about who knows more about Saunas. I'm afraid I can't help as I know nothing about them either from a punting point of view or a historical/ technical one.

Can anyone help this punter please,  so we can all get back to the burning issue of punting ie how much water to pour on the hot rock things.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2014, 02:10:01 am by vorian »

Offline overhead

Re: What happens in a Sauna
« Reply #24 on: February 12, 2014, 02:34:06 am »
Maybe it is just me but I assumed the OP is a semi newbie punter looking for some advice and help in relation to SEXUAL activities one could expect in a sauna environment how one goes about paying for the sex, asking about the sex, how to get the sex. That sort of thing, a punter asking a other punters about punting.

Not and maybe the OP can correct me if I'm wrong the very detailed breakdown of how saunas technically work, the history and origins of saunas and the way saunas effect the body was not perhaps what he was looking to learn from UKP. This information seems more suited to "Saunas Monthly". Then it becomes an argument about who knows more about Saunas. I'm afraid I can't help as I know nothing about them either from a punting point of view or a historical/ technical one.

Can anyone help this punter please,  so we can all get back to the burning issue of punting ie how much water to pour on the hot rock things.

I think that with a thread title such as - What happens in a Sauna - all the above is pretty much on-topic. I posted links and a bit of guidance for others in response to those who posted a load of mis-leading ignorance.

No one is forcing you to read the thread, and as far as the sexual possibilities are concerned, no one is denying you the opportunity to contribute.